Policy

Brief

If not the most significant technological development of the past 50 years, the internet is certainly somewhere at the top of the list. It’s enabled an unprecedented dissemination of knowledge to the vast majority of Americans while also becoming an integral part of our economy and the way we entertain ourselves. It’s an essential part of our modern lives.

The repeal of net neutrality protections threatens the free internet for all Americans. It is imperative that we protect this technology so that all Americans can continue to enjoy unfettered and affordable access to the internet.

On top of keeping ISPs classified under Title II, competition should be increased through local-loop unbundling. This would provide access to the expensive, final wires connecting the internet “backbone” to residences to startups trying to innovate and compete in an otherwise stifled market. By doing so, prices will come down away from their current monopoly levels and thus increase internet access further.

 

Whoever has the most money or clout is a terrible way to decide who gets the most bandwidth on the Internet. Net Neutrality has served us well and should continue to be the law. I will make it so as President.
— Andrew

 

Problems to be Solved

  • Reclassifying ISPs under Title I allows them to begin slowing down your internet and charging you more for services you currently enjoy as part of your internet package
  • Competition is stifled in the ISP market, which drives prices up to monopoly levels
Goals
  • Keep ISPs from throttling the internet or charging more for access to certain online resources
  • Increase competition between internet providers to keep prices under control and allow for innovation
Guiding Principles
  • Education
  • Fairness
  • Affordability
  • Innovation

 

 

As President, I will…

  • Appoint members to the FCC that will immediately reclassify ISPs under Title II of the Communications Act, thus allowing the FCC to regulate them and reinforce net neutrality
  • Unbundle local loops so that new competitors can innovate and keep prices for internet access under control